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  • Eye's

    Don't work your eyes, Let your eyes work.
    We all know vision is very important, but controlling the eyes is just as important.
    Learning to control the eyes is A key to good shooting.
    The eyes are very fast and no target can out run them.
    So what causes the eyes to not stay in place and wait on the flash of the target?
    1. not giving the eyes time to get still.
    2. not having something to hold the eyes still, as when you look into space.
    3. being tense or jumpy.
    4. trying to anticipate the flash and the mind wants to get a jump or head start.

    Controlling the eyes is simple, just hold them still, see the target, follow the target and watch it break. But even though it is simple, that doesn't mean it is easy.

    Here are a few tricks.
    1. relax your eyes and jaw while keeping your eyes wide open.
    2. when you go to your look point, give your eyes time to get still.
    3. use your peripheral vision and lock on something like the edge of the house to hold your eyes still until the flash of the target.
    4. be ready to see the target when you call for it.
    5. don't flash your eyes left and right (which is called streaking) trying to see something (the target) that is not there, THIS IS WORKING THE EYES


    KEEP YOUR EYES STILL AND LET THEM DO THE WORK.

    High 2 Lookpoint

    Question:

    WAM,

    High 2 is shot eight times during a 100-target event (hopefully only eight times). It is considered by many to be the most difficult target in the game. For many internet spectators, a better understand of that shot would go a long way, allowing them a greater enjoyment of the game.

    For right handed shooters, using a sustained lead technique, a hold point of 1/3 of the way between the house and the center stake is standard. Some might hold tighter, others further out, but the topic of your thread is ‘Eyes’. I don’t want to side track onto anything other then ‘look points’ and/or technique for eye focus. It would however be beneficial to thoroughly understand your methodology for ‘Eyes’ on High 2.

    High 2 Look Point: Are you looking significantly left of your barrel, perhaps ½-way back between your barrel and the window, or even farther left then that? You indicated that you do not see the high house building in your peripheral vision, but what about the other side? Is your look point so far left that you do not see your barrel on the right side in your peripheral vision? Are there certain benefits and/or pitfalls that you see in that look point that others should be aware of? Is there a ‘standard’ or starting point for a location to look for the target, and then adjustments from that starting point? Something like the 1/3 mark for the hold point.

    Secondly, you indicate that one of the keys is not to move before the target flies into your focal zone. Keeping one’s look point stationary, waiting for the target to fly into your focus; well that is easier said then done! It really is a mental thing, it’s what I call ‘eye discipline’ and it is one of the things that separate you from the rest of us schlubs. Do you have any mental techniques that you utilize? Example, do you conscientiously tell yourself ‘eye discipline’ just prior to stepping onto the pad or some other such trigger? Or does 'staying at home' come easily to you without any type of special mental technique?

    Appreciate your help!

    -JR

    Answer:

    JR

    Ok on high 2, I hold about 3 feet past parallel, level with bottom of window, head locked on gun (don’t turn head away from gun), look as far to the left as possible and I don’t see the gun, move on the flash, shoot at the nose of the target, don’t wait to see it clearly, you will see it clearly just as it breaks. This is the only target that I move on the flash.

    As far as mental techniques, the only thing I think on this shot is look at the target.

    With all targets especially fast out goers, if you make a good normal move and you shoot the nose off, move the hold point in a rib width, if you shoot the back off of the target, move out a rib width. And yes, hold point are that critical.

    Hope this helps.

    ALLEN aka wam

    Look Points

    Question:


    Allen - Have enjoyed your site and just read the Q&A. Writing about H2 you
    say it's the only target that you move on the flash. Does this imply it's
    the only target that you rely on your peripheral vision for your look point?
    Are you otherwise looking into the window to first see the targets and
    subsequently make a move?

    With the exception of a few stations (primarily 1, 2, 7, 8) I'm
    inconsistent when it comes to my look points - a lot of variability. So mid
    field I tend to drift between looking straight into the window vs just off
    the house to catch that first flash like on H2 (a technique I mostly use
    when shooting sporting and trap). Mostly relying on sustained lead my break
    points on the mid field stations are just before or at the center. Not
    surprisingly the inconsistency with where I look doesn't promote a lot of
    confidence. Any thoughts? Thanks - Sean

    Answer:

    Sean,

    I do look at the edge of the window, but don't hard focus. I look only hard
    enough to keep my eyes still. When you do what I do, you have to have a 1/3+ hold point, that is a hold that allows you to see the flash, pick up focus on the target, then move when the target is at the proper relationship with the gun. Your eyes are way faster than the target and faster than you can move the gun, so it is really easy to let the eyes do the moving with the target until you need to move the gun. Now it is also easy for the eyes to out run the target, so it takes some discipline to get a custom to this way of shooting. The main thing is for the eyes to be still and ready, and by looking at the edge of the window helps my eyes to be still. I relate it to baseball, I want to see the ball come out of the pitchers hand, I don't look somewhere between the pitcher and home plate. I want to see what the target is doing as fast as possible and this method gives me all the time that is there. I see the flash, my eyes pick it up, focus on it, move with it to my gun start point, lock on it, see the lead and watch the target break.

    Hope this will help you.
    Allen aka WAM

    Contact Me
    Email: allenmccannon@yahoo.com